Recent research shows that mice also do nightmares: potentially help to enhance memory

When the mouse is frightened during the day, its brain fear center will be re-activated during sleep – potentially helping to enhance memory. According to foreign media reports, you have not been warned before going to bed do not look at horror movies, or night will do nightmares? At present, the latest one may support this view, but it or will explain why dreams contribute to the formation of long-term memory. When the mouse is frightened during the day, its brain fear center will be re-activated during sleep – potentially helping to enhance memory. The study was conducted by researchers at the University of New York, which involved measuring the degree of brain activity during the day when the mice ran in the maze. British “New Scientist Magazine” pointed out that the researchers said the mouse brain hippocampus store the maze map, the hippocampus is the brain two curved structure. The different areas of the mouse will be treated by different nerve cell groups, along with the rats running in the labyrinth, and different neuronal cell groups will be activated in turn. When the mice explode the labyrinth, the maze sequence they observe will again “replay” when they enter the sleep state compared to the maze path they are awake. The researchers believe that this will help to form long-term memory. In order to verify whether these re-activated memories also include emotions, the researchers used a keyboard cleaner at a specific point in the labyrinth, letting the mouse smell a weird smell, and after an unpleasant experience, the smell was harmless. It is not surprising that the researchers are afraid of the particular position for the researchers, “said Dr. Gabrielle Girardeau, co-author of the study.” When the mouse did not get to the position of the keyboard cleaner, “The researchers recorded the activity of the hippocampus in the rats, as well as their amygdala, and when the animals were shocked, they became very active when they reached the keyboard cleaner area. When the mice are in sleep, the maze of their memories will be replayed, and their amygdala becomes active and can dream of the unique location of the maze. The study shows that memory does not contain only information, but also contains emotions. While it is unclear whether these mice are really dreaming, studies have shown that traumatic experiences can lead to nightmares, but other researchers say the process can store memory. (Allure)

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